#15: Claire Cain Miller – Admitting and Overcoming Bias

Research shows that developing empathy, connection and compassion is crucial to a sustainable and humane society. But, in order to do that we must first admit our own biases, overcome them and step outside of our bubbles – or comfort zones.  

So, how do we do that?  Claire Cain Miller is a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist who covers gender, work, family and the way technology changes our lives. She writes for The Upshot – a New York Times site about politics, economics and everyday life. In one of her recent articles, How to Be More Empathetic, she offers a guide on doing just that – bursting our bubbles to become better members of society with evidenced-based exercises anyone can do to increase empathy.

Show notes & links:

Reading literary fiction is one of those evidenced-based exercisers. We’ve listed three books Claire recommends during the episode:

In addition, this The Ezra Klein Show episode also came up during our conversation with Claire: Jay Rosen is Pessimistic About the Media. So am I.

Original music by Podington Bear.

#14: Bob McKinnon – Headwinds & Tailwinds

What happens when we change the narrative of the classic American Dream mantra – that our position in life depends on more than just pulling ourselves up by our own bootstraps? How does this impact reaching our personal and professional goals, helping others reach theirs and how public policy and resources are developed?

Bob McKinnon is an author and founder of GALEWiLL, an organization that designs social change programs, executive director of the online platform Moving Up and creator of Your American Dream Score – a quiz to help you reflect on the headwinds and tailwinds guiding your life and an opportunity to better empathize with the journeys of others.

Show notes & links:

Original music by Podington Bear & Kevin Beasley

#13: Kara Moore – Being Present

Kara Moore is the lead facilitator at Kickstand Comedy Space in Portland, OR.  Having studied, performed, and coached improv and sketch comedy since 2001. She says improv is more about being a hardcore listener than it is about trying to be funny. We had a fun conversation with Kara about being present, genuinely portraying subjects, and how the best improvisers listen for cues to further the narrative.

Show notes & links:

Original music by Podington Bear

#12: Eli Saslow – Building Trust

Eli Saslow is an award-winning journalist and a staff writer for The Washington Post. In 2014, he received a Pulitzer Prize Award for his work on food stamps in post-recession America. His most recent book, Rising Out of Hatred tells the story of Derek Black’s transition from an emerging white supremacist leader, to an outspoken opposer of the white nationalist movement.

Show notes & links:

#11: Gabe Howe – Literal Common Ground

Gabe Howe is the Executive Director of the Siskiyou Mountain Club. The group works to maintain and promote remote trail systems in southwest Oregon. Gabe finds that when volunteers from different walks of life and diverse backgrounds come together in the wilderness, they’re able to connect in special ways over a literal common ground.

Show notes & links:

#8: Gary Noesner – FBI Hostage Negotiator

Gary Noesner was the FBI negotiator at Waco in 1993, where David Koresh and the Branch Davidians waged a 51-day siege against authorities. This is just one of the many high-profile cases Gary has worked on, and we wondered what a career in negotiating life-or-death situations teaches you about listening.

Show notes & links:

#7: Celeste Headlee – Listening to Become More Human

Being in the hosting chair of public radio for almost 20 years made Celeste Headlee discover how bad most of our conversations are. What are we doing wrong? And how can we make it right?

Show notes & links: